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MILF

Brief Background on the Moro Struggle

Posted on Monday, 6 June, 2011 – 17:38

 

The Philippine Government has long sought to find ways and means to address the discontent of the Moros in Mindanao. However, efforts in the past have been criticized as mainly assimilationist, without regard to their special characteristics and desire for their right to self-government.

The Moros claim a distinct history and ways of life from the majority-Filipinos who were incorporated in the Spanish colonial regime. They claim they were annexed to the Philippine territory under the American regime, and later in the independent Philippine Republic, without their consent. As a result of economic policies, new land laws, and migration programs that began in the 1900s, the Moros have become minorities in their traditional abode. Today, the Muslim-dominated provinces in Mindanao are among the poorest provinces in the country, with per capita incomes and human development indices below the national average.  In national politics and society, they feel they are discriminated and marginalized. All these have built-up resentment that was mobilized in the form of armed movements against the Philippine state.

The armed conflict in Muslim Mindanao that began in the late 1960s was in the nature of an independence movement. However, since the Tripoli Agreement of 23 December 1976 signed between the Marcos government and the Nur Misuari-led Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), the terms of negotiations revolved around crafting an autonomous arrangement within the Philippine state as an expression of the Moro people’s right to self-determination.

Although the 1987 Constitution called for the establishment of an autonomous region in Muslim Mindanao, and Congress subsequently passed Republic Act 6734 in 1989 and Republic Act 9054 (amending RA 6734) in 2001 as part of the terms of  Final Peace Agreement (FPA) signed between the MNLF and the Ramos Administration in 1996, these proved unsatisfactory to both the MNLF and  the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), a break-away group of Moro leaders led by Salamat Hashim that was formally constituted in 1984.

The MNLF claims that several key provisions in the 1996 FPA remain unimplemented. The MILF, for its part, wants the highest form of autonomy while remaining an integral part of the Philippine territory.

The Philippine Government has pursued peace negotiations with the Moro liberation groups in order to end the armed conflict, address the social, cultural and economic inequities, and arrive at a viable political arrangement that will reconcile the ideals of Moro self-government, good governance, and national sovereignty.

The road to a peacefully negotiated political settlement has not been easy.  When hostilities broke out in 2000, government spent P1.337 Billion for combat expenses in four (4) months of fighting. After negotiations broke down in August 2008 with the botched Memorandum of Agreement on Ancestral Domain (MOA-AD), more than five hundred thousand (500,000) people were displaced as a result of the fighting.

 

Signed Agreements

Posted on Monday, 6 June, 2011 – 17:28

 

Listed below are the signed agreements between the government and the MILF. To view the short description of each agreement, click here.

 

– Agreement on Peace Between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (Tripoli Agreement of 2001)  |  June 22, 2001

Agreement for General Cessation of Hostilities  |  July 21, 1997

– Implementing Administrative Guidelines of the GRP-MILF Agreement on the General Cessation of Hostilities  |  September 12, 1997

Implementing Operational Guidelines of the GRP-MILF Agreement on the General Cessation of Hostilities  |  November 14, 1997

– Implementing Guidelines on the Security Aspect of the GRP-MILF Tripoli Agreement of Peace of 2001  |  August 7, 2001

– Manual of Instructions for CCCH and LMTS  |  October 18, 2001

Joint Communique Between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (AHJAG)  |  May 6, 2002

– Joint Statement (Special Meeting of the GRP-MILF Panels)  |  August 27, 2007

Civilian Protection Component of the International Monitoring Team (IMT)  |  October 27, 2009

– Terms of Reference of the International Monitoring Team  |  December 9, 2009

– Interim Implementing Guidelines of the Joint Communique of 06 May 2002  |  December 9, 2002

Terms of Reference of the Civilian Protection Component (CPC) of the International Monitoring Team  |  May 5, 2010

– Guidelines for the Implementation of the Philippine Campaign to Ban Landmines-Fondation Suisse De Deminage (PCBL-FSD) Project Pursuant to the Joint Statement of the GRP-MILF Peace Panels Dated 15 November 2007  |  May 5, 2010

– Implementing Guidelines on the Humanitarian, Rehabilitation and Development Aspects of the GRP-MILF Tripoli Agreement of Peace 2001  |  May 7, 2002

– Joint Statement of the GRP Interagency Technical Working Group (GRP IATWG) and the Bangsamoro Development Agency (BDA)  |  November 8, 2008

– Statement of Understanding  |  April 6, 2004

– Agreement of the General Framework for the Resumption of Peace Talks Between the GRP and the MILF  |  March 24, 2001

– Joint Statement (Exploratory Talks)  |  March 28, 2003

– Joint Statement (5th Exploratory Talks)  |  February 20, 2004

– Joint Statement (6th Exploratory Talks)  |  December 21, 2004

– Joint Statement (7th Exploratory Talks)  |  April 20, 2005

– Joint Statement (8th Exploratory Talks)  |  June 21, 2005

– Joint Statement (9th Exploratory Talks)  |  September 16, 2005

– Joint Statement (10th Exploratory Talks)  |  February 7, 2005

– Joint Statement (12th Exploratory Talks)  |  May 4, 2006

– Joint Statement (Special Meeting of the GRP and MILF Chairmen)  |  October 24, 2007

– Joint Statement (14th Exploratory Talks)  |  November 15, 2007

– Joint Statement (Special Meeting of the GRP and MILF Chairmen)  |  July 29, 2009

– Framework Agreement on the Formation of the International Contact Group for the GRP-MILF Peace Process  |  September 15, 2009

– Joint Statement (Special Meeting of the GRP and MILF Chairmen)  |  December 2, 2009

– Joint Statement; Resumption of the GRP-MILF Peace Negotiations (16th Exploratory Talks)  |  December 9, 2009

– Press Release (17th Exploratory Talks)  |  January 28, 2010

– Joint Statement (18th Exploratory Talks)

– Declaration of Continuity for Peace Negotiation Between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front  |  June 3, 2010

Joint Statement (20th Exploratory Talks) | February 10, 2011

Joint Statement (21st Exploratory Talks) | April 28, 2011

Statement of GPH Peace Panel Chair Dean Marvic Leonen on the Conclusion of the 22nd Formal Exploratory Talks                                 | August 23, 2011

– Statement of Panel Chair Marvic Leonen (GPH-MILF Informal Executive Meeting)  |  November 3, 2011

Joint Statement  (23rd  Exploratory Talks) |   December  7, 2011

Joint Statement  (24th  Exploratory Talks)  |  January  11, 2012

Joint Statement  (25th  Exploratory Talks)  |  Feburary 15, 2012

Joint Statement (26th Exploratory Talks)    | March 21, 2012

Joint Statement (27th Exploratory Talks) | April 24, 2012

Decision Points of Principles as of April 2012

Joint Statement (29th Exploratory Talks) | July 18, 2012

Joint Statement (30th Exploratory Talks) | August 11, 2012

Joint Statement (31st Exploratory Talks) | September 8, 2012

Joint Communique (32nd Exploratory Talks) | October 7, 2012

Framework Agreement on the Bangsamoro | October 15, 2012

Joint Statement (33rd Formal Exploratory Talks) | November 17, 2012

 

Links OPPAP:  http://opapp.gov.ph/peace-tracks-milf

 

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